Controlling Single Sign-On to Web Applications with Novell SecureLogin (NSL)



By: mugirish

February 13, 2008 1:36 am

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Novell SecureLogin is a very versatile solution that provides single sign-on capability to almost any kind of application, such as Web, Windows, Terminal emulators, and Java applications.

Problem

With respect to Web single sign-on, NSL currently supports Internet Explorer and Firefox as browsers. During NSL installation, if a user has both Internet Explorer and Firefox installed on the workstation, NSL will install the supporting files for both browsers. Once this is done, the user gets single sign-on functionality on both browsers. However, sometimes the user might want functionality to work on either of the browsers but not both. This can be done by un-installing NSL and re-installing it in the absence of Internet Explorer or Firefox. This is a tedious and time-consuming job for an end user who might not be familiar with tasks related to application deployment.

This problem can be overcome by disabling certain add-ons from browsers. This article gives you an overview on how to achieve this.

Solution: Web Single Sign-on with Novell SecureLogin

Novell SecureLogin has a very strong support for Web single sign-on in the form of Web Wizards and strong pre-built scripts. Because NSL supports Internet Explorer and Firefox as browsers , it has different mechanisms for providing single sign-on functionality in both browsers.

In the case of Internet Explorer , NSL provides a browser add-on named IESSOObj Class, which extends the functionality of Internet Explorer to provide single sign-on capability to Web applications. This is an add-on which is loaded as part of Internet Explorer launch and keeps running until the browser session is closed.

1. To view the NSL add-on for Internet Explorer, go to Tools > Manage Add-ons.

Figure 1: Add-on used by Internet Explorer for Web single sign-on

Similarly, in the case of Firefox, NSL provides an add-on in the form of a browser extension named SLoMoz , which extends the functionality of Firefox to provide single sign-on capability to Web applications.

2. To view the NSL add-on for Firefox, go to Tools > Manage Add-ons.

Figure 2: Add-on used by Firefox for Web single sign-on

Enabling/Disabling Web single sign-on

As defined in the problem statement, an end user may want Web single sign-on to work only on Internet Explorer or on Firefox. This situation requires the user to disable the Web single sign-on functionality either browser as needed. This can be achieved very easily by following either of the two approaches below.

Preventing Firefox from Providing Web Single Sign-on

To use Internet Explorer for Web single sign-on instead of Firefox,

1. Launch Firefox and go to Tools > Add-Ons.

Figure 3: Location of add-ons for Firefox

2. When the Add-Ons pop-up menu is launched, search for the browser extension named SLoMoz and click Disable as shown below.

Figure 4: Button to disable the add-on used by Firefox for Web single sign-on.

3. Restart the browser for the changes to take effect.

Disabling Internet Explorer from Providing Web Single Sign-on

To use Firefox for Web single sign-on instead of Internet Explorer,

1. Launch Internet Explorer and go to Tools > Manage Add-Ons.

Figure 5: Location of Add-ons for Internet Explorer

2. When the Manage Add-Ons pop-up menu is launched, search for the browser add-on named IESSOObj Class, which extends the functionality of Internet Explorer to provide single sign-on capability.

3. Select it and choose Disable (it is enabled by default).

4. Click OK to confirm the operation as shown below.

Figure 6: Button to disable the add-on used for Internet Explorer

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Disclaimer: As with everything else at NetIQ Cool Solutions, this content is definitely not supported by NetIQ, so Customer Support will not be able to help you if it has any adverse effect on your environment.  It just worked for at least one person, and perhaps it will be useful for you too.  Be sure to test in a non-production environment.

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